This is a collection of images posted to the GLC Mailing List, in reverse chronological order, identified by date and submitting member. The last item is thus dated 1st of the month; older images can be seen in the archive pages linked in the Table of Contents on the right.

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Tony Reznicek, 29 Sep 2020

Tony Reznicek, 29 Sep 2020

In the fall, plant interest switches to fall color, species in the Aster family, and fall bulbs – with a few other specialty items. So here are a few things that are nice now – not all rock garden plants.

Tony Reznicek, 24 Sep 2020

Tony Reznicek, 24 Sep 2020

While we are taking a wait and see attitude to the fall sale – and planning ZOOM programs, like everyone else, there are actually a few things in bloom that will tide us over until the fall flush of members of the daisy family. And of course, this is the time for lusty Arum fruiting spikes. Lycoris sprengeri is one of two that bloom with some regularity for me – the other being the old standby, L. squamigera. Another bulb is the Barnardia japonica (formerly Scilla), with those odd flesh colored flowers on naked stems (like the Lycoris, the leaves are produced in the spring). The dwarf mounding Lobelia siphilitica is a Canadian selection from Wrightman Alpines – never more than 8 inches or so tall, and quite nice. Finally, I was startled to notice that I had a lot of The small, earlier blooming Begonia sinensis seed into my tufa wall, from plants at the base. Maybe reminiscent of their native habitat in China?

Holly Pilon, 22 Sep 2020

Here are some late season bloomers in my yard; at least the first three are. They are all Colchicums, C. autumnale 'Alba', C. bornmeulleri and C. 'Water Lily'. The last is a clump of Goodyera oblongifolia I found when I visited the UP last week, in the Pictured Rocks National Park. There were quite a few along a trail and many of them growing in almost full sun. And setting seed.

Tony Reznicek, 15 Sep 2020

Tony Reznicek, 15 Sep 2020

In the meantime, until the October sale we hope for, enjoy the first flower on Cyclamen mirabile.

Joan Bolt, 15 Sep 2020

Joan Bolt, 15 Sep 2020

Cyclamen

Esther Benedict, 08 Sep 2020

Esther Benedict, 08 Sep 2020

The season is not over yet. I keep working on patches of cyclamen. Seeds are the way to go. Don't waste your money on tubers unless they come potted. Edelweiss sells them potted. Seeds are super easy—store in fridge till August, soak and plant out. Sometimes the first leaf appears yet that fall.

Origanum dictamnus came thru last winter in the crevice bed under dry overhang.

Tony Reznicek, 03 Sep 2020

Tony Reznicek, 03 Sep 2020

These should really be late August plants – but I didn't quite get to things. A nice late August blooming Colchicum is the lovely patterned hybrid C. xagrippinum. The most patterned (tessellated) Colchicum is C. variegatum, but that species is quite difficult to manage outdoors. This is thought to be a hybrid of it and probably C. autumnale and is very easy and showy. Cyclamen are typically early spring and late fall – but for C. purpurascens, which blooms in late summer and is also unusual in not having a dormant period – the leaves are present all summer long. This makes it difficult to handle in the bulb trade, but fortunately, it is easy from seed and also very hardy. Like the other Cyclamen, there are various attractive leaf forms – attached are a few. Finally, we all love the hardy cliff dwelling gesneriads, Ramondas and Haberleas, but Hemiboea is a large – almost shrubby – forest understory species from China with hairy, vaguely gloxinia-like flowers that is surprisingly hardy once established.

Darlene Nadane, 08 Sep 2020

Darlene Nadane, 08 Sep 2020

Roscoea purpurea ‘Family Jewels’